American Swords,  LLC.

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Preserving the History of Antique American Swords
circa 1850 Militia Officer's Sword

Maker: Chicopee, Ames

circa 1830 Militia Officer's Sword

Maker: Springfield, Ames

Circa 1840 Knights Head Militia Officer's Sword

Maker: F. W. Widmann


Circa 1800-1815
Pillow Pommel Officer's Sword

Maker: Bolton & Co.

Five Ball Pillow Pommel with ivory grip and American Eagle on blade.

Circa 1815-1820's
High Grade Mounted Officer's Sword

This sword is featured in Kevin Hoffman's e-book, Swords of Honor & Regulation

Maker: Unknown

Blade Marked: K & S

This section will be ever evolving.  The material to cover a century of history up to the Civil War is staggering.  One of the most glaring current shortcomings of this section, is the lack of coverage of Nathan Starr and other early American sword makers.  These will be added in time.  This is a new website.  My goal is to develop it into an extensive online reference site for American swords and other historical artifacts.  Please check back from time to time, as I will be adding to it.  

Myth or Fact?

The straight-bladed sword was brought into regulation in 1821.

Circa 1825
Ketland Eagle Head Mounted Infantry Officer's Saber

Maker: Unknown, but likely of French inspiration

Circa 1830
Eagle Head Artillery Officer's Sword

Maker: Unknown

Circa 1835 Eagle Head Artillery Officer's Sword

Maker: F. W. Widmann

This sword is featured in a full color plate in The American Eagle-Pommel Sword: The Early Years - 1794-1830 by E. Andrew Mowbray a Publication of Man at Arms Magazine.

M1832/1834
General Officer's Sword (Dated 1839)

Maker: Ames

M1832/1834 General Officer's Sword

Maker: F. W. Widmann

The scabbard of this sword was used in John Thillman's book Civil War Army Swords: A Study of United States Army Swords from 1832 through 1865 published by Mowbray Publishers, 2008.

Myth or Fact?

Swords with gold-gilded scabbards usually denote General Officer or Artillery Officer Swords.  Silver- plated swords and scabbards denote Infantry Officer Swords.

"The sword is the axis of the world and its power is absolute."

CharlesDeGaulle

Myth or Fact?

War of 1812: On January 14, 1815, the Battle of New Orleans was fought.  The battle took place two weeks after peace had been ratified in Europe; such was the speed of communication. 

Circa 1821 - 1835
Ketland Eagle Head Infantry Officer's Sword

Maker: Unknown - Marked with a "G" (possibly Thomas Gill) on the ricasso.

High Grade ketland Eagle Head Presentation Sword

Maker: Unknown

This sword is featured in the color photos section of The American Eagle-Pommel Sword: The Early Years - 1793-1830

by E. Andrew Mowbray a Publication of Man at Arms Magazine and in Kevin Hoffman's E-Book Swords of Glory.

Early Ketland Eagle Head Mounted Infantry Officer's Saber

Maker: Unknown

(Likely origination in Birmingham, England)

Circa 1815 - 1830  Artillery Officer's Saber

Maker: Unknown

circa 1840 Militia Officer's Sword

 Maker: Possibly F. W. Widmann

circa 1850 Militia Officer's Sword

Maker: Ames

circa 1840 Militia Officer's Sword

Maker: Unknown

Circa 1805 Eagle Head Officer's Saber

Maker: Unknown (Likely made in Birmingham, England)

(Click pictures for full detail)

American Swords Used Prior To The U.S. Civil War

Federal & Earlier Period Swords